Gregory S. Jones,  “The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Seven: Nuclear Test Controversies,” May 3, 2017.  This paper is the seventh and last in a series that examines in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper addresses false claims regarding several nuclear tests.  It shows that the 1962 U.S. test of reactor-grade plutonium used plutonium with a Pu-240 content of between 20% and 23%.  This plutonium was produced in British plutonium production reactors.  The British Totem nuclear test series used plutonium which at most was mid-range weapon-grade and therefore did not provide any information regarding the suitability of non-weapon-grade plutonium in nuclear weapons. To read a pdf of the full paper click here

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Gregory S. Jones, "The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Six: Reactor-Grade Plutonium in the Nuclear Weapon Programs of Sweden, Pakistan and India,” April 3, 2017.  This paper is the sixth in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper shows that both Sweden and Pakistan at one time chose to use reactor-grade plutonium in their nuclear weapon development programs.  India has retained the option to use reactor-grade plutonium in its nuclear weapon program and has possibly already used reactor-grade plutonium to produce up to half of its nuclear arsenal.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here

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Gregory S. Jones, “The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Five: Radiation and Critical Mass,” February 27, 2017.  This paper is the fifth in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper shows that neither the increased radiation from reactor-grade plutonium nor its increased critical mass are impediments to the use of reactor-grade plutonium to produce nuclear weapons.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here

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Gregory S. Jones, "The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Four: Heat,” December 15, 2016.  This paper is the fourth in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper shows that the decay heat of plutonium is not an impediment to the use of reactor-grade plutonium to produce nuclear weapons. To read a pdf of the full paper click here

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Gregory S, Jones, “The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Three: Predetonation,” October 25, 2016.  This paper is the third in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper will show that the problem of the predetonation of an unboosted implosion fission weapon is not an impediment to the use of reactor-grade plutonium to produce nuclear weapons.  Moreover, boosted nuclear weapons may become the norm for early stage nuclear weapon states and these weapons are immune to predetonation.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here.

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Gregory S. Jones, "The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part Two,” September 1, 2016.  This paper is the second in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  This paper provides a short history of views regarding the nuclear weapon dangers of reactor-grade plutonium.  It also discusses how the nuclear industry’s desire to recycle plutonium has led it to downplay its dangers. To read a pdf of the full paper click here.

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Gregory S Jones, “The Myth of ‘Denatured’ Plutonium: Reactor-Grade Plutonium and Nuclear Weapons, Part One,” July 26, 2016.  In 1976 the U.S. revealed that reactor-grade plutonium can be used to produce nuclear weapons, yet there are still those in the nuclear industry who dispute this fact.  This paper is the first in a series that will examine in detail the nuclear weapon dangers posed by reactor-grade plutonium.  The paper describes some of the basic properties of plutonium, how it is classified into different grades, the variation in reactor fuel burnup and the properties of plutonium produced by different reactor fuels.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here.

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Gregory S. Jones, "The History of the Pu 240 Content of U.S. Weapon-Grade Plutonium,” May 4, 2016.  The declassification of documents related to the operation of the plutonium production reactors at Hanford allows the construction of a history of the Pu 240 content of U.S. weapon-grade plutonium.  In the 1940s the limit on the permissible Pu 240 content was 2.0% due to the relatively slow assembly time associated with early implosion fission weapons.  As implosion technology improved, the Pu 240 limit increased and was as high as 8.8% by 1954.  However, operating problems at Hanford limited the Pu 240 content to 5.5% until 1959, when it was set at its current value of 6.0%.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here.

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Gregory S. Jones, "What Was the Pu-240 Content of the Plutonium Used in the U.S. 1962 Nuclear Test of Reactor-Grade Plutonium?,"  May 6, 2013.  There have been many assertions that the plutonium used in this nuclear test was not truly reactor-grade but only fuel-grade.  However, an examination of the historical evidence shows that it was indeed reactor-grade.  To read a pdf of the full paper click here.